NEW TRIUMPH SCRAMBLER 1200 UNVEILED!

2024 Triumph Scrambler 1200 X and XE
Triumph’s 2024 Scrambler 1200 lineup has been revealed, with the NEW and more accessible 1200 X for the road and beyond, PLUS an updated 1200 XE for the tar, for adventure touring and extreme off-road fun.

Featuring Triumph’s high-power 1200cc Bonneville engine with torque-rich performance, off-road ready 21-inch front wheel and Triumph’s premium quality and finish, the two new models look set to raise the bar even higher for performance and style.

2024 Triumph Scrambler 1200 range announced

The new Scrambler 1200 X delivers the same exceptional core capability, commanding riding position, and torque-rich performance Scrambler customers love, combined with a generous specification of equipment and technology. Built to be more accessible, the Scrambler 1200 X has a seat height of 820mm, reducing to 795mm with the accessory low seat, a dedicated feature that offers exceptional functionality at a more competitive price and a 16,000km service interval to lower the cost of ownership.

Triumph Scrambler 1200 X
The new Triumph Scrambler 1200 X comes in a choice of Ash Grey, Carnival Red and Sapphire Black.

The cool and capable Scrambler 1200 XE also hits the road in the new year sporting updates including latest-generation Brembo Stylema® calipers, new suspension with enhanced adjustability, enhanced styling details and improved touring capability.

2024 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE
The 2024 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE comes in a choice of Baja Phantom Black, Baja Orange and Sapphire Black.

Due on our Triumph showroom floor in early ’24! Preorder now at your adventure specialist City Coast Motorcycles: Call (02) 42287392 or email: bikesales@citycoastmotorcycles.com.au

Tackling the Outback: Adventure Tyres Put to the Test

Images of Moto Adventure in Outback

Our Sales Team’s Peter is an intrepid two-wheel adventurer with decades of experience. He and couple of experienced enduro mates recently undertook a grueling 4000 kms in the saddle. Each chose a different set of tyres from our best-selling adventure brands and put them to the test. How did they fare? Read on…

The Ride

Three off-road bikes were trailered roughly 1600km on tar to Port Augusta Shoreline Caravan Park. They were all single-cylinder 650-700cc modified trail bikes. The route consisted of mostly 70 percent red, rocky dirt roads, 20 percent tar, plus ten percent rock trail.

TIGER 1200: RAISING THE BAR WITH EVEN LOWER SUSPENSION

Tiger 1200 Suspension

 

Triumph Motorcycles has released a brand-new enhancement to its advanced Showa semi-active suspension across the all-new Tiger 1200 range, which was first launched in November 2021.  Active Preload Reduction  has been developed to reduce the rear suspension preload as the bike slows, allowing the seat heights to be reduced.

 

For the road focussed GT Pro and GT Explorer, there are currently two seat height settings – 850mm and 870mm, while for the all-terrain Rally Pro and Rally Explorer these are 875mm and 895mm respectively. Through the accessory-fit low-seat option, riders are already able to lower the seat position by an additional 20mm, giving a lowest seat height of 830mm on the GT family and 855mm on the Rally family. The new  feature allows these seat heights to be reduced further.

 

Depending on the combined weight of the rider, pillion and luggage, Active Preload Reduction could lower the riding height by up to 20mm when the motorcycle comes to a standstill. New customers will be able to access this new minimum preload feature by simply pressing the ‘Home’ button on the switch cube for one second, while The new update will be available to existing Tiger 1200 customers at City Coast Motorcycles during their next service.

 

“This new feature can be enabled on the fly, lowering the centre of gravity at slower speeds, making it even more accessible, thus offering riders more confidence at slow speeds and better contact with the ground as they come to stop,” Triumph Motorcycles Chief Product Officer Steve Sargent said.

 

The all-new Tiger 1200 was designed to be the world’s most capable, agile and manoeuvrable large-capacity adventure motorcycle. The Tiger 1200 GT Explorer, with its 30-litre fuel capacity, was even the bike of choice for Enduro World Champion Ivan Cervantes when he broke the record for riding the furthest in 24 hours on a motorcycle.

 

ENQUIRE HERE

BOOK TIGER 1200 SERVICE

One marriage, two bikes and three dogs: Meet The Pack Track

Nine years ago, Aussies Janell and Stu set off to explore the globe on two wheels. In that time, they have clocked up over 200,000 kms and a growing family of rescue dogs. Janell chats to us about their adventures and how she wouldn’t have it any other way…

Q&A with The Pack Track

Q: Janell, let’s start at the beginning. What age were you when you began riding?

At the tender age of 23, I took the plunge and got my motorcycle license in Sydney. Living in Lane Cove at the time and returning to university after an 18-month hiatus, I found myself faced with the daunting prospect of spending up to four hours a day on public transport to get to UNSW Kensington campus. Thankfully, my husband, Stu had a solution; why not ditch the dreary commute and hop on a motorbike instead? With his encouragement, I began my two-wheeled journey on my brother-in-law’s 50cc scooter, and immediately fell in love with the freedom and fun that came with it. However, it didn’t take long for me to realise that I wanted something more powerful, so I upgraded to a Yamaha Virago 250cc. While it wasn’t a particularly loud bike, I did enjoy the rumble of the engine when I rode through the Sydney Harbour tunnel. I’ve been hooked on the thrill of riding ever since.

Image of Janell Clarke

Q: How has motorcycling brought you and your partner, Stu closer together?

Stu and I lived almost separate lives before we embarked on our trip. Stu was in the Navy and often away from home so I kept myself busy with work, soccer, study, friends and family. Even the weeks before we departed Australia we hardly saw each other with our time taken up selling our stuff and sorting out paperwork. Everything changed the moment our feet landed in Texas where we were now in each other’s pockets and making decisions together, every hour of every day. It will come as no surprise that there was a certain amount of discord in the first few months as we adjusted to our new life. Adventure riding threw us together in a way that has allowed us to break free from routine, depend on each other, work together to overcome challenges and experience the world in a way that’s truly unique. We feel incredibly lucky to be able to share that with each other. From the rugged terrain of South America to the bustling streets of Bangkok, we’ve travelled far and wide on our motorcycles, forging unforgettable memories and deepening our connection with each passing mile.

Jordan

Q: What models are you and Stu currently riding and how do they suit moto-adventuring?

I have a 2006 BMW F650GS and Stu has the 2012 G50GS. They are fairly light bikes with a dry weight of 175 kg, they have a reasonable clearance for off-road riding and they have just enough mod-cons to make them safe and comfortable without overcomplicating things. To be honest it was a little bit of pot luck but we have been able to solve most breakdowns on the side of the road with minimal hassle. And because the bikes are almost identical mechanically, we only needed to learn how to fix one of them and bring along minimal spares. We purchased these bikes second-hand in Texas, and they’ve been our faithful companions for the past nine years, carrying us through 107 countries and over 200,000km of unforgettable adventures.

Stu and Janell Clarke in Bankok

Q: As “The Pack Track”, your global motorcycle tour kicked off in 2014; how did this come about?

 On our very first date way back in 2004, Stu and I first shared our love of travel and adventure. We dreamed of backpacking our way around the world, but life had other plans for us. In 2006, we adopted Skyla, a beautiful dog from Woden pound, and she quickly became the centre of our world. For years, we spent our holidays exploring Australia in our trusty Nissan Patrol, with Skyla along for the ride. But the desire to see more of the world never faded, and we continued to talk about embarking on a big trip. However, I was hesitant to leave Skyla behind, and we couldn’t imagine travelling without her. One boozy ANZAC Day in Sydney in 2011, we made a pact to hit the road and bring Skyla with us when Stu’s return of service to the Navy was complete. We knew that travelling with our 4WD would be too expensive, so we started exploring other options, eventually landing on the idea of motorcycle travel. It wasn’t easy figuring out how to take Skyla with us, but we were determined to make it work. And now, years later, we couldn’t be happier that we did.

Norway

Q: How were you able to finance your worldwide travels?

Financing a round-the-world trip is no small feat, but we managed to make it happen through a combination of careful saving, smart investments, and a bit of entrepreneurship. For starters, we made a conscious decision not to buy a house in Australia, instead opting to rent and put our money towards travel. We also saved aggressively in the years leading up to our trip, cutting back on expenses and prioritising travel above all else. A later addition has been starting a small business, selling our very own motorcycle dog carrier the Pillion Pooch. We came up with the idea for our motorcycle dog carrier in Australia in preparation for the trip but received a lot of positive feedback and realised there was a market for people who wanted to do the same thing as us with their dogs. We started the business while on the road and it has been a challenge but we’re very proud of our product and it supplements the travel a little. In addition to our business, we’ve also worked odd jobs and picked up work along the way, particularly during our time in the UK. It hasn’t always been easy, but we’ve found creative ways to make it work.

Pillion Pooch

Q: Adventuring the far reaches of virtually every continent has its challenges, let alone on two wheels. However, organising logistics such as passports for dogs is on another level! How do you prepare for life on the road with your canine companions?

We often have chats and video calls with people from all over the world planning to travel with their dogs. The first point I make is not to worry about food, vets, accommodation etc; that will all work out in each country, just don’t be in a rush and always buy a sim card so you have internet to search online. The daily life travelling with a dog is very rewarding and not difficult if you have your own transport. The challenge or sometimes the unknown is the border crossings. In general – and this applies to motorcycles and dogs – it’s much easier to enter/leave a country via a land border than it is to via a port or airport. If you fly with a dog then the airline often wants a certificate from a department of agriculture or quarantine centre verifying all your dogs vaccinations and the airline may require a health certificate stating that the pet is fit and healthy to fly. It has been our experience that at land borders they look at the rabies vaccination date and if that’s okay then we’re through.

Snoozing

We travelled the America’s first and from memory, we had to complete paperwork for our dog entering Panama and then moving between Chile and Argentina. From the America’s we sailed to Europe where we very quickly got our dogs EU Pet Passports. These are great and so long as you keep the vaccinations up-to-date you can come and go from the EU without any problems. We have continued to use our EU Pet passports travelling Africa, Central Asia and now South-East Asia. It would be great if there was an international passport for pets officially recognised around the world like a human passport, perhaps one day in the future.

Stu checking in the family for Vietnam

Q: How has travelling with rescue dogs enriched your adventures?

I love dogs more than anything and can’t imagine ever living without my four legged friends. They are loyal and inspiring companions and willing to go the extra mile to be by my side. What more could you want in a travelling companion? They never complain, they jump out of bed excited every morning and somehow soften the gap with strangers allowing people to approach to strike up a conversation who otherwise wouldn’t. Border crossings can be amusing, like the time a border officer in Burkina Faso asked for the dogs’ documents and laughed at the sight of their passport photos in their pet passports that he nearly fell off his seat. I could definitely see the funny side, the Officer explained that he didn’t even have a passport himself and was looking at a dog more travelled than most humans. My dogs have given my adventure and my life meaning, they are a constant reminder of what is important and how precious our time is. I do very normal things every day because of my dogs, like dog walking, food shopping and visits to the vet and as a result, we’ve been mistaken for locals and treated with the kind of warmth and hospitality that is hard to come by when you’re just passing through as a tourist.

Pyramids in Sudan

Early in our travels we moved very quickly but over the years we have come to really appreciate a slower pace of travel which is more suited to our dogs. We often stop in places out of season for a week or sometimes a month and go to the same cafe for breakfast, walk the same route with our girls, stop at the same bar for a beer and really get to know and feel a place rather than rushing around the tourist attractions. This slower pace allows us to watch, learn and converse with the locals to see what life is like in each of these countries. Travelling with my dogs has been a true gift, enriching my life in countless ways and reminding me of what really matters in life. All my girls are very different. Weeti is strong and quiet, Shadow is loud and proud, Azra is just a bundle of laughs because she’s still very young. They make me laugh all the time and feel loved which is important when you are far from home.

Doggy Globe-trotters

Q: You and Stu have trekked 107 countries on two wheels with canine friends in tow. Which three places have been your top riding destinations, and why?

Mexico is a loud, colourful country with so much to offer motorcyclists. There are stunning mountains to pass, beautiful coastlines, deserts and ancient ruins. There isn’t a single thing I don’t like about Mexico. It’s very affordable with lively people and excellent food, not-to-mention my favourite drink, Margaritas!

Turkey is also incredibly beautiful with mountains and coastal roads. It is another large country to explore but it has something very special going on…the people protect and carefor the  street dogs and cats like nowhere else in the world, something that really resonates with me. There is something for everyone in Turkey with fascinating history learning about the Ottoman empire, bustling markets, modern cities, motorcycle clubs, stunning architecture and friendly people who prefer to sit and enjoy a tea or coffee than get a takeaway.

Mongolia is like being on another planet. The landscape, the weather and the way of life is so very different to anywhere else in the world. It is a very special country and I would go back with my motorcycle and my dogs in a heartbeat to explore it more both on road and off-road. All you need is a tent and a few days of food and off you go with your motorcycle wherever you want.

Moto-touring in Mongolia

Q: We get there can be bumps in the road and you have visited some pretty far-flung locations. Have there been any misadventures you’d rather forget?

There have been many misadventures but nothing I want to forget. I would say that one of my many flaws is that I can overthink situations and needlessly worry so more something wish I could change. The problem with worrying is that it takes over, takes your energy and stops you from enjoying the moments life has offered. For example, last year we rode the Pamir Highway. It is a legendary route that traverses through the mountainous terrain of Tajikistan and is considered to be one of the world’s highest-altitude highways, reaching over 4,600 metres in some parts. During the soviet era it was a serviced road that connected Dushanbe to Osh in Kyrgyzstan but conflict between the two nations has resulted in a closed border for many years and the road has deteriorated to a very challenging and rugged ride. We read online that it might be possible to do the Tajikistan-Kyrgyzstan border crossing. In the town of Khorog we dedicated three days to gaining permissions from the Tajikistan military and through a Kyrgyzstan tour guide, permissions from both the Kyrgyzstan military and tourist board to pass through the border with our motorcycles and our dogs.

Pamir Highway

We set off from Khorog to the border with really no idea if this would work and the prospect of having to return the whole way along the Pamir Highway to Dushanbe if it failed and probably miss our window to reach Mongolia because it was already October. The ride from Khorog to the border is absolutely stunning and there is nobody there. I should have relished this ride but I was so worried about the border and missing Mongolia that I didn’t let myself fully immerse in the experience like Stu did. In the end we crossed the border, we were the first tourists in over three years to do it and it was an incredibly proud moment for us but overshadowed by all my worries. And to be honest, after eight years I should have known better because if you don’t take one road then you take another and still forge incredible memories. Fortunately, I can savour our achievements looking back on that ride but I do wish I’d taken the time to relax and enjoy whatever the outcome was going to be.

Iraq

Q: If you could give one key piece of advice to a motorcyclist preparing to travel abroad, what would it be? 

The most important lesson I have learnt about travelling is not to plan too much. Even if you have a very short trip, if you plan everything and give yourself deadlines then there’s not much wiggle room for adventure, mistakes and the unexpected to happen. I think the point of travel, and particularly on a motorcycle where you really have the freedom to go anywhere, is to be away from routine, structure and predictability. Its okay to know absolutely nothing about where you are going when you travel because you will learn and in a very hands-on way so you never forget. Oh, and of course take your dog!

Turkiye

 Q: The Pack Track website has a nifty Route Optimiser tool. Did you develop this?

Stu is the brains in our relationship. He developed the route optimiser which is just a coding exercise for solving the travelling salesman problem. You can enter as many locations as you like and then run the script and it calculates the optimum route to minimise travel distance between all the points. It’s mostly useful in a city if we’re on foot with a bunch of places we want to visit in one day and we’re taking the dogs (walking slowly). We have occasionally used it to compare travel distances around cities in Europe because the cost of fuel is quite expensive and we are always trying to keep our costs to a minimum.

Mongolia

Q: Congratulations on your first two publications, “The Pack Track Unleashed” and “The Pack Track Stowaways”. How can people get their hands on a copy?

Thank you very much! We’re actually running a Kickstarter campaign to get these books off the ground. We would appreciate any support people can offer from sharing the campaign with friends and family right through to pre-ordering an eBook, soft or hard cover copy. You need to sign up to the Kickstarter platform and then have a credit card handy to back our project: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/thepacktrack/books1-2

Publications by The Pack Track

Connect with Janell and Stu:

Facebook: fb.me/ThePackTrack
Instagram: instagram.com/ThePackTrack
Web: ThePackTrack.com
Youtube: www.Youtube.com/ThePackTrack

Derek’s Reflection: Indian-Pacific Cannonball Classic

Derek Sheppard Indian-Pacific Cannonball 2022
City Coast Motorcycles sales team’s Derek Sheppard recently travelled coast-to-coast aboard an antique motorcycle in support of the Royal Flying Doctor Service. Read Derek’s story in his own words…

The Australian Indian Pacific Cannonball Classic 2022 follows in the footsteps of the American version that is universally recognised as the most difficult antique motorcycles endurance event in the world. The “Cannonball” pays homage to long distance pioneer Erwin “Cannonball” Baker, and other historical figures that literally paved the way across both America and Australia in the early 1900’s.

Erwin Baker
The original Cannonball trailblazer, Erwin Baker. Image courtesy of Rideapart.com

My Indian Pacific Cannonball adventure began in early 2021 when my good friend and City Coast Motorcycles customer Michael Johnson mentioned the event. He explained they had been trying to get it underway for a few years, but COVID State lockdowns had prevented it.

A prerequisite for entry is that the motorcycle must be pre-1948. This date is universally accepted as being pre-hydraulic suspension, ie girder fork and rigid frame.

The entries opened in in June 2021 and were capped at 100 due to the resource limitations of the outback towns. Such was the anticipation and enthusiasm for the event that I registered the minute bookings opened and was entry number 62!

2022 start line
The 2022 start line ahead of the 2022 Indian-Pacific Cannonball Classic. Image by Tanya Chrystall

I entered owning a 1933 Ariel NH350 Red Hunter Twin Port that I had restored some 25 years ago. Whilst this bike hasn’t failed me, I knew it would be a tough event for the bike with the original manual recommending a top-end overhaul every 500 miles and a top cruising speed of around 65kph.

Once accepted, I steadily worked on preparing the Ariel but also started searching for a larger capacity pre-1948 machine. Eventually, my friend and past City Coast Motorcycles staff member Kevin Brown managed to track down a 1942 WLA Harley Davidson locally. The bike was previously owned by the late Tony Blain; a long-term Harley Davidson aficionado and owner of Redfern Motorcycles. He had sold the bike to a local collector 22 years prior to me buying it, and it was never started or ridden under his ownership.

Derek with his two antique motorcycles
Derek with his 1942 WLA Harley Davidson and 1933 Ariel NH350 Red Hunter Twin Port

Such was Kevin’s enthusiasm for the event that Michael and I were endeavouring to undertake, that he offered to be my support vehicle driver for which I will be eternally indebted. Without the help of Kevin and his wife Karen I would not have been eligible to compete (a condition of entry was that every bike entered must have both a dedicated support vehicle seat for the rider and a bike trailer spot).

I was now preparing two bikes for the event! Both were mechanically as good as I could make them without compromising the integrity of the proven miles they already had under their wheels. Immediately prior to the event I decided I would undertake a three-day 1500 km ride down around Victoria and back on the Harley as it was the least proven bike. This was designed to ensure that both me and the bike could do three successive 500km days as I knew that would be required during the event. I learnt a lot about riding antique bikes but both me and the bike survived the experience.

Derek on his 1942 HD
Derek tested his antique motorcycle on a 1,500km round trip to Victoria ahead of the big event. Image by Foot in Bowl Photography

The Indian Pacific Cannonball Classic started in Busselton, Western Australia on October 13 and ended 5000km’s later in Merimbula, NSW. I turned up in Busselton a few days prior to the start and was immediately welcomed into the antique motorcycling community. Everybody was very friendly and willing to offer advice, guidance and assistance as necessary.

One of the first people I met was Glen “Gunner” Foley; an antique motorcycle collector and long-term Harley Davidson mechanic. Gunner was riding an earlier civilian version of my bike and had similar objectives to my own, so we immediately developed a connection and would ride together periodically over the early stages until his buke suffered in the heavy rain. Gunner was truly one of the great characters of the event and was subsequently announced as the “Tony Blain Spirit of the Event” award recipient.

Derek and Gunner
Derek and new mate Gunner

The 2022 Cannonball consisted of 14 stages with the longest stages being around 500kms and the shortest stage being around 200kms. The display prior to the start was a seriously impressive array of well-prepared antique motorcycles. Some retained their original patina that clearly gave some insight into the journeys of their life to date, whilst others were immaculately restored to better than original!

My major goal was to get across the Nullarbor on an antique hand-shift motorcycle. To this end I rode quite conservatively sitting on about 75kph. The bike is happiest between 45 and 50 mph but quite interestingly the exact happy point moves continuously as you ride. I think air temperature, moisture and fuel quality have a significant effect on the “feel” of older bikes. You have to learn not to worry about every new rattle or change in vibration!

Derek west of the Nullarbor
Derek soaking up the scenery to the west of the Nullarbor Plains

The bikes are not easy to ride and take considerable concentration as they have no effective brakes or suspension. You need to constantly manage riding to the road in terms of avoiding bumps, potholes and managing the terrain (assents and descents are undertaken in second gear with a maximum speed of about 40kph). Even the Nullarbor and 90 Mile Straight were never boring such was the challenge of the roads, road trains, weather and scenery.

Derek at the 90 Mile Straight
“The Nullarbor and 90 Mile Straight were never boring such was the challenge of the roads, road trains, weather and scenery,” says Derek

The bikes are old and take considerable maintenance. Most competitors would spend several hours at least each evening undertaking maintenance and repairs. Apart from breaking seven spokes in my front wheel necessitating a replacement, my daily maintenance consisted of checking and lubricating both the primary and final drive chains, checking the battery voltage and water level, greasing all bushes and bearings and checking the tyres and tyre pressures.

In crossing Australia the final drive chain was adjusted once, the valves were checked and adjusted three times (the exhaust valves closed up on most bikes due to the extended high speed running), the points were filed and adjusted twice, the generator reset once, the air filter oil topped up once, grease points lubricated every three days and wheel bearings twice, engine oil changed twice, gearbox oil checked and topped up every three days.

Derek maintaining his motorcycle
Valve adjustments are a part of the daily maintenance on the Cannonball Classic.

Two standouts in terms of repairs and maintenance were an Invincible JAP that seized with the owner attempting an overnight rebuild. After failing again, he drove home rebuilt the bike and re-joined the event in Victoria. The second was a 1922 four-cylinder Henderson that required between three to 10 hours maintenance each day and cruised at 60kph.Two other fine achievements were a pair of BSA M20’s that also completed the event.   

The most impressive achievement was that of Bill Brice, Malcom Brice and Peter McBride who rode from home to the start via Cairns, Darwin, and Broome without support. All then completed the event unaided and each completed their circumnavigation of Australia following the event.

Malcolm Brice and Peter McBride
Malcolm Brice and Peter McBride riding to the start at Busselton via Cairns, Darwin and Broome

The Cannonball winner is the oldest bike to finish every stage unaided and within the rather tight time limits set for each stage. The 2022 statistics were: 100 entries, 92 starters, 82 actually crossed the start line, 54 finished and 22 finished without assistance (of which I was one). Sadly, one of our riders Ken Phelps riding a 1948 Vincent HRD passed away following an incident with a Kangaroo near Deniliquin and another rider Mario Balatti suffered some significant injuries including a broken ankle after hitting a large pothole at the start of the Snowy Mountains. He is recovering well. The well-deserved winner of the 2022 Indian Pacific Cannonball Classic was Chris Wells on a 1924 Harley Davidson.

Chris Wells' winning motorcycles
Chris Wells’ winning motorcycles

Undertaking such an event is expensive and takes considerable time and effort, but it was up there with my best motorcycling experiences over the last 40 years. I think my words after finishing sum up the overall experience perfectly:

“We were excited, we were anxious, we were happy, we were sad, we laughed, we cried.
We fixed bikes, we watched others fix bikes, we lent parts and borrowed parts, we helped each other.
We met old friends and made many new ones.
We travelled some straight roads we travelled some curvy roads.
We rode in sunshine, we road in rain.
We raised some money for the Royal Flying Doctor Service.
Most importantly of all we got to share an epic adventure together!”

Keep your motorcycling dreams and adventures alive. It’s a great way to see the country and meet new people.

– Derek –

Bikes on the Murray River
2022 Cannonballers lining the Murray River. Image by John Johnson

Announcing: BMW 5-Year Factory Warranty!

BMW Five Year WarrantyCity Coast Motorcycles and BMW Motorrad Australia are excited to announce five year, unlimited kilometre factory warranty on all new BMW Motorcycles.

BMW Motorrad continues to raise the bar, with the new warranty offering being the first of its kind by any motorcycle manufacturer in Australia. It further complements BMW’s extensive range of ownership benefits while offering long term peace of mind for riders during their two-wheel journey.

The Roadside Assistance program remains at three years and is backed by national support in the event of an emergency at any hour of the day, 365 days a year.

BMW’s five-year warranty takes effect from November 1, with a validity period backdated to registrations from October 1, 2022.

There’s never been a better time to #MakeLifeARide. Discover our magnificent range of dream bikes, genuine parts, riderwear and the convenience of BMW Motor Finance and Insurance Services at our Illawarra showroom – 262 Keira Street, Wollongong.

Try the CE-04 for #TheRideOfYourLife

Test Ride the BMW CE 04

In celebration of #Wollongong2022 the BMW CE-04 is returning to City Coast Motorcycles. Back by popular demand, we have secured not one, but two of these revolutionary electric scooters until September 30.

Take a test ride and discover a new era on two wheels which seamlessly integrates into your everyday life thanks to its intelligent connectivity solutions – from navigation to clothing; a fun commuter that simply charges at a 220V wall socket, boasting too many features to mention! Quite simply #PluggedToLife.

But don’t just take OUR word for it…

“With its futuristic look,
loads of power,
comfortable riding position
and heaps of tech;
this scooter was just so brilliant to ride!”
– Frank Triple Moto

Ride of Your Life

“I could see myself having one of these
in the garage without a doubt!”
– Rob Charlwood, Throttle Downunder

Ride of your life

Chris Allen Q&A: From Paratrooper to Publishing

Former paratrooper and motorcycling enthusiast Chris Allen has been deployed to Africa, South East Asia and Central America, retiring as Major. After hanging up his army boots, Chris led international security operations in East Timor, oversaw counter terrorism measures in the wake of the September 11 attacks and was headhunted to protect our nation’s Sydney Opera House. In 2008 he was appointed Sheriff of NSW. Chris is now a full-time author residing and riding on the South Coast. We chat to him about the inspiration for his action-adventure novels and the vital role motorcycling serves in his personal life.  

Chris Allen Author
Where did your love of motorcycling begin?

“Honestly, years ago but I only finally got around to taking it up in 2017. When I was in the Army, a lot of my mates had bikes and it was one of those things that I wanted to do but didn’t prioritise. Around 2017-18 I was going through a very tough period personally and a friend suggested I take up riding. I know the cliché is that any middle-aged man buying a motorbike is a classic mid-life crisis, but in my case – and I know this to be true for many others – it was all about my mental health. The process of learning to ride, choosing the right bike (a Yamaha 650 V Star, which I called ‘The Sheriff’) getting out on the road and embracing the total experience of riding got me through one of the toughest periods of my life. For me it’s all about quiet solitude and peace of mind. I absolutely love it!”

Image of Chris Allen and his Yamaha V Star ©Simona Janek/Samantha Theron
Chris and “The Sheriff” ©Simona Janek/Samantha Theron

What model are you riding now?

“I have a beautiful 2014 1700cc Triumph Thunderbird LT, which I call ‘The Major’. In one of life’s meant-to-be moments, I’d brought ‘The Sheriff’ into City Coast Motorcycles for a service and rego check. Once I’d handed it over to Les, I decided to have a wander around the showroom for what I thought would be a casual browse. I was chatting with Tim about bikes and looking at the new Triumph Bonneville range, when my eyes fell upon the Thunderbird. It was love at first sight; a classic cruiser in the red and black livery, with all the quality and style that you can only really get with a Triumph. I couldn’t ignore the fact that it was exactly what I wanted. So, I took it for a test ride and the next day found myself trading in my beloved 650 and taking the reins of a 1700. The first time I sat on the bike and was getting ready to head off down Keira Street, I remember feeling pretty intimidated because I’d never ridden anything more than my 650. I have to say though, as soon as I eased off the clutch and got going, the Thunderbird pretty much rode itself. It was an incredible experience and I loved it immediately.”

You served as a paratrooper for many years. Did you get to ride on two wheels on any missions?

“As much as I’d love to say ‘Yes’ to this, sadly the answer is ‘No’. Although, the prospect of a Steve McQueen Great Escape moment would have been sensational! That said, as a paratrooper there was never a shortage of opportunities for an adrenalin rush. From memory, McQueen rode an early 1960s Triumph in the Great Escape, which they modified to look like a wartime German BMW.”

Chris is a former paratrooper who served with the Australian Army
Chris is a former paratrooper who served with the Australian Army, retiring at the rank of Major

As a returned soldier, what role does motorcycling play in your life today?

“For me and a lot of other ex-soldiers, motorcycling is all about mental health and the total enjoyment of the experience. Every ride is different, and you have to be thinking all the time. That’s why it’s so good for you mentally. If you’re going through something in your life and you’re feeling totally consumed by it, getting on the bike allows you to reset. Whenever I’m in the garage and look at the Thunderbird I know there’s an adventure just waiting to happen. And, if you can, that’s the moment to gear up. Once I was off my Ps and my boys were old enough, I started taking them both out for rides. They loved it immediately. I take the approach that it’s super important to give kids a healthy respect for riding as early as possible. In short, motorcycling has been life-changing for me. It’s something that can only be truly understood by doing it.”

You are a well-established author. Do you derive inspiration from real life experience?

“Yeah, a lot of the general background to my main characters and the situations they experience are loosely based on my own career and life, and also some of my closest friends. Obviously, however, when you’re writing action thrillers you have to make everything much larger than life in order to make it exciting for the reader. I wouldn’t survive half of the stuff I’ve thrown at my main protagonist, Alex Morgan, in the Intrepid series! He was lucky to survive the first book! I’ve taken the approach that it’s important to find a strong balance between realism and escapism. I like to make the reader feel like they’re right in the middle of the action while also taking them on an adventure. The greatest compliment I’ve had from many of my readers is when they tell me they’ve missed their bus or train stop because they’ve been so engrossed in the story. As a writer, you know you’ve done something right when that happens…even though I feel bad that they’ve missed their stop!”

In 2008 Chris was appointed Sheriff of New South Wales
In 2008 Chris was appointed Sheriff of New South Wales

OK Chris, what’s the connection – how does your Triumph Thunderbird LT (The Major) fit into the current book you’re penning?

“I’m really excited about this new book. It’s a departure from my Alex Morgan/Intrepid series which is unapologetically, very action-oriented. The new book features a character named Benjamin Rhett and is much more of a traditional thriller. It’s set mostly here on the NSW south coast – in and around Wollongong, along with some international connections. The reason I said discovering the Thunderbird at City Coast Motorcycles was a meant-to-be moment, is that when I originally started developing Benjamin Rhett’s story a couple of years ago, I knew that motorcycling was going to be an important part of Ben’s lifestyle. At that time, I’d been researching what my next bike would be and when I recently started working on the draft from 2019, I found that I had already written in the Triumph Thunderbird LT (in red & black livery) as the bike! So, you can imagine that when I was chatting with Tim that day and saw the bike just sitting there, I knew I had to have it. Like me, Ben is in his 50s and riding is a huge part of his mental health regime. He has a lot of personal history and trauma to come to terms with and the Triumph is integral to that process”

Has your character Benjamin Rhett always loved motorcycles, or is this a new relationship?

“I’ve kept this story relatively close to my own experience of riding. So, yeah, for Ben it’s a new relationship that came into his life at a time when he really needed it.”

Author Chris Allen with his 2014 Triumph Thunderbird LT
Chris says. “it was love at first sight” when his eyes fell upon a 2014 Triumph Thunderbird LT at City Coast Motorcycles

Where’s your favourite place to go for a cruise?

“The NSW South Coast is one of the best locations to ride motorbikes. From the National Park north of Stanwell Tops, over the Sea Cliff Bridge and along the coast, all the way down to Berry, Nowra or beyond to Jervis Bay, you can’t go wrong. Depends on my mood. I even enjoy the ride up to Sydney occasionally, although I hate dealing with the traffic once you’re up there.”

The Thunderbird’s perfect for a cruise with a pillion. Have you taken your boys for a spin?

“I actually haven’t taken the boys out on the LT yet!! I’ve been waiting for the nicer weather and focusing on me getting more familiar with the bike.”

Where to from here, Chris; are there any other bikes you’re planning to add to your collection?

“It’d be very easy to try and sound cool by saying Triumph’s Speed Triple 1200 or the Rocket 3, but I’ll leave those to the younger folks! To be honest I’m more inclined towards the Tiger adventure bike range, the 900 or 1200. A great mate of mine has recently bought one and he loves it. I can’t see myself ever getting rid of my Thunderbird, so if I was to get a Tiger, they’d be sharing space in the garage.”

Defender, Hunter, Avenger and Helldiver by Chris Allen
Chris Allen is a full-time author, penning adult adventure/thriller fiction including the Intrepid series

Chris has four novels in his Intrepid series: Defender, Hunter, Avenger and Helldiver. He is currently finishing the first trilogy in the Intrepid series called, The Dark Heart which will be released in 2022 and includes the stories: Ranger, Shapeshifter and Spider. Chris is also working on the first in a new thriller series featuring motorcycle enthusiast and south coast resident, Benjamin Rhett! This new book will be in all good book stores in 2023.

Visit Chris Allen’s Official Website

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Petition: Support Trail and ADV Riding in NSW

Support Trail and ADV Riding in NSW

Trail bike access to popular NSW areas such as the Watagans and Newnes State Forest is under threat.

The National Parks and Wildlife Service – who manages many key riding areas such as Newnes Plateau and Cullen Bullen State Forest – is planning to close access to singletrack trails for motorcycles in only a few months.

The current plan is for 4WDs to have dedicated trails that can be shared, but single track will be off limits.

Clearly this will negatively impact the enjoyment of recreational trail riders, especially those located in Sydney and surrounds. What can we do about this? In the first instance, we all need to sign the petition addressed to the Minister for the Environment.

The petition asks that funding is provided for a strategic plan for motorcycle trail and adventure riding – something that NPWS needs to consider if it is to allow singletack access to motorcycles. The petition also asks for the singletrack access decision to be overturned and that the Minister of Transport introduces a recreational registration system similar to the one used in VIC to enable better compliance with legal requirements.

Please consider signing the petition at the link below before 26 August 2022 and ask your mates to do the same:

SIGN THE PETITION HERE

Your Ticket to the FIM WSBK Championship Season Finale

WSBK Champ Finale Tickets
Catch three action-packed days of non-stop racing featuring some of the best riders at one of the top racetracks on the planet!

City Coast Motorcycles in conjunction with Pirelli is offering a 3 DAY WORLD SUPERBIKE GENERAL ADMISSION/PADDOCK PASS for the weekend of Friday 18th November – Sunday 20th November 2022 at Phillip Island.

STEP 1

Simply purchase a pair of Pirelli tyres at City Coast Motorcycles from the following selection between July 25th 2022 and October 31st 2022, or until sold out:
Diablo™ Supercorsa SP, Diablo Rosso™ IV Corsa, Diablo Rosso™ IV, Diablo Rosso™ Corsa II, Diablo Rosso™ III, Angel™ GT II, Angel GT, Night Dragon™, Night Dragon™GT, Scorpion™ Rally, Scorpion™ Rally STR or Scorpion™ Trail II

STEP 2

Complete your details at the link below with your proof of purchase to redeem your ticket.

REDEEM YOU TICKET HERE

Pass numbers are limited so see us at 262 Keira St Wollongong now to lock in your pass to one of the best motorsport weekends on the Australian racing calendar.

Pirelli_Angel-GT-II_Set

Pirelli_Scorpion-Rally-STR_Set

Pirelli_Diablo-Rosso-Corsa-II_Set

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